Explicit and implicit tensor decomposition-based algorithms and applications

Various real-life data such as time series and multi-sensor recordings can be represented by vectors and matrices, which are one-way and two-way arrays of numerical values, respectively. Valuable information can be extracted from these measured data matrices by means of matrix factorizations in a broad range of applications within signal processing, data mining, and machine learning. While matrix-based methods are powerful and well-known tools for various applications, they are limited to single-mode variations, making them ill-suited to tackle multi-way data without loss of information. Higher-order tensors are a natural extension of vectors (first order) and matrices (second order), enabling us to represent multi-way arrays of numerical values, which have become ubiquitous in signal processing and data mining applications. By leveraging the powerful utitilies offered by tensor decompositions such as compression and uniqueness properties, we can extract more information from multi-way ...

Boussé, Martijn — KU Leuven


Unsupervised and semi-supervised Non-negative Matrix Factorization methods for brain tumor segmentation using multi-parametric MRI data

Gliomas represent about 80% of all malignant primary brain tumors. Despite recent advancements in glioma research, patient outcome remains poor. The 5 year survival rate of the most common and most malignant subtype, i.e. glioblastoma, is about 5%. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the imaging modality of choice in the management of brain tumor patients. Conventional MRI (cMRI) provides excellent soft tissue contrast without exposing the patient to potentially harmful ionizing radiation. Over the past decade, advanced MRI modalities, such as perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) have gained interest in the clinical field, and their added value regarding brain tumor diagnosis, treatment planning and follow-up has been recognized. Tumor segmentation involves the imaging-based delineation of a tumor and its subcompartments. In gliomas, segmentation plays an important role in treatment planning as well ...

Sauwen, Nicolas — KU Leuven


Speech Enhancement Using Nonnegative Matrix Factorization and Hidden Markov Models

Reducing interference noise in a noisy speech recording has been a challenging task for many years yet has a variety of applications, for example, in handsfree mobile communications, in speech recognition, and in hearing aids. Traditional single-channel noise reduction schemes, such as Wiener filtering, do not work satisfactorily in the presence of non-stationary background noise. Alternatively, supervised approaches, where the noise type is known in advance, lead to higher-quality enhanced speech signals. This dissertation proposes supervised and unsupervised single-channel noise reduction algorithms. We consider two classes of methods for this purpose: approaches based on nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) and methods based on hidden Markov models (HMM). The contributions of this dissertation can be divided into three main (overlapping) parts. First, we propose NMF-based enhancement approaches that use temporal dependencies of the speech signals. In a standard NMF, the important temporal ...

Mohammadiha, Nasser — KTH Royal Institute of Technology


Sound Source Separation in Monaural Music Signals

Sound source separation refers to the task of estimating the signals produced by individual sound sources from a complex acoustic mixture. It has several applications, since monophonic signals can be processed more efficiently and flexibly than polyphonic mixtures. This thesis deals with the separation of monaural, or, one-channel music recordings. We concentrate on separation methods, where the sources to be separated are not known beforehand. Instead, the separation is enabled by utilizing the common properties of real-world sound sources, which are their continuity, sparseness, and repetition in time and frequency, and their harmonic spectral structures. One of the separation approaches taken here use unsupervised learning and the other uses model-based inference based on sinusoidal modeling. Most of the existing unsupervised separation algorithms are based on a linear instantaneous signal model, where each frame of the input mixture signal is modeled ...

Virtanen, Tuomas — Tampere University of Technology


Compressed sensing approaches to large-scale tensor decompositions

Today’s society is characterized by an abundance of data that is generated at an unprecedented velocity. However, much of this data is immediately thrown away by compression or information extraction. In a compressed sensing (CS) setting the inherent sparsity in many datasets is exploited by avoiding the acquisition of superfluous data in the first place. We combine this technique with tensors, or multiway arrays of numerical values, which are higher-order generalizations of vectors and matrices. As the number of entries scales exponentially in the order, tensor problems are often large-scale. We show that the combination of simple, low-rank tensor decompositions with CS effectively alleviates or even breaks the so-called curse of dimensionality. After discussing the larger data fusion optimization framework for coupled and constrained tensor decompositions, we investigate three categories of CS type algorithms to deal with large-scale problems. First, ...

Vervliet, Nico — KU Leuven


Advanced Algebraic Concepts for Efficient Multi-Channel Signal Processing

Modern society is undergoing a fundamental change in the way we interact with technology. More and more devices are becoming "smart" by gaining advanced computation capabilities and communication interfaces, from household appliances over transportation systems to large-scale networks like the power grid. Recording, processing, and exchanging digital information is thus becoming increasingly important. As a growing share of devices is nowadays mobile and hence battery-powered, a particular interest in efficient digital signal processing techniques emerges. This thesis contributes to this goal by demonstrating methods for finding efficient algebraic solutions to various applications of multi-channel digital signal processing. These may not always result in the best possible system performance. However, they often come close while being significantly simpler to describe and to implement. The simpler description facilitates a thorough analysis of their performance which is crucial to design robust and reliable ...

Roemer, Florian — Ilmenau University of Technology


Spectral Variability in Hyperspectral Unmixing: Multiscale, Tensor, and Neural Network-based Approaches

The spectral signatures of the materials contained in hyperspectral images, also called endmembers (EMs), can be significantly affected by variations in atmospheric, illumination or environmental conditions typically occurring within an image. Traditional spectral unmixing (SU) algorithms neglect the spectral variability of the endmembers, what propagates significant mismodeling errors throughout the whole unmixing process and compromises the quality of the estimated abundances. Therefore, significant effort have been recently dedicated to mitigate the effects of spectral variability in SU. However, many challenges still remain in how to best explore a priori information about the problem in order to improve the quality, the robustness and the efficiency of SU algorithms that account for spectral variability. In this thesis, new strategies are developed to address spectral variability in SU. First, an (over)-segmentation-based multiscale regularization strategy is proposed to explore spatial information about the abundance ...

Borsoi, Ricardo Augusto — Université Côte d'Azur; Federal University of Santa Catarina


Solving inverse problems in room acoustics using physical models, sparse regularization and numerical optimization

Reverberation consists of a complex acoustic phenomenon that occurs inside rooms. Many audio signal processing methods, addressing source localization, signal enhancement and other tasks, often assume absence of reverberation. Consequently, reverberant environments are considered challenging as state-ofthe-art methods can perform poorly. The acoustics of a room can be described using a variety of mathematical models, among which, physical models are the most complete and accurate. The use of physical models in audio signal processing methods is often non-trivial since it can lead to ill-posed inverse problems. These inverse problems require proper regularization to achieve meaningful results and involve the solution of computationally intensive large-scale optimization problems. Recently, however, sparse regularization has been applied successfully to inverse problems arising in different scientific areas. The increased computational power of modern computers and the development of new efficient optimization algorithms makes it possible ...

Antonello, Niccolò — KU Leuven


Bayesian Fusion of Multi-band Images: A Powerful Tool for Super-resolution

Hyperspectral (HS) imaging, which consists of acquiring a same scene in several hundreds of contiguous spectral bands (a three dimensional data cube), has opened a new range of relevant applications, such as target detection [MS02], classification [C.-03] and spectral unmixing [BDPD+12]. However, while HS sensors provide abundant spectral information, their spatial resolution is generally more limited. Thus, fusing the HS image with other highly resolved images of the same scene, such as multispectral (MS) or panchromatic (PAN) images is an interesting problem. The problem of fusing a high spectral and low spatial resolution image with an auxiliary image of higher spatial but lower spectral resolution, also known as multi-resolution image fusion, has been explored for many years [AMV+11]. From an application point of view, this problem is also important as motivated by recent national programs, e.g., the Japanese next-generation space-borne ...

Wei, Qi — University of Toulouse


On some aspects of inverse problems in image processing

This work is concerned with two image-processing problems, image deconvolution with incomplete observations and data fusion of spectral images, and with some of the algorithms that are used to solve these and related problems. In image-deconvolution problems, the diagonalization of the blurring operator by means of the discrete Fourier transform usually yields very large speedups. When there are incomplete observations (e.g., in the case of unknown boundaries), standard deconvolution techniques normally involve non-diagonalizable operators, resulting in rather slow methods, or, otherwise, use inexact convolution models, resulting in the occurrence of artifacts in the enhanced images. We propose a new deconvolution framework for images with incomplete observations that allows one to work with diagonalizable convolution operators, and therefore is very fast. The framework is also an efficient, high-quality alternative to existing methods of dealing with the image boundaries, such as edge ...

Simões, Miguel — Universidade de Lisboa, Instituto Superior Técnico & Université Grenoble Alpes


Constrained Non-negative Matrix Factorization for Vocabulary Acquisition from Continuous Speech

One desideratum in designing cognitive robots is autonomous learning of communication skills, just like humans. The primary step towards this goal is vocabulary acquisition. Being different from the training procedures of the state-of-the-art automatic speech recognition (ASR) systems, vocabulary acquisition cannot rely on prior knowledge of language in the same way. Like what infants do, the acquisition process should be data-driven with multi-level abstraction and coupled with multi-modal inputs. To avoid lengthy training efforts in a word-by-word interactive learning process, a clever learning agent should be able to acquire vocabularies from continuous speech automatically. The work presented in this thesis is entitled \emph{Constrained Non-negative Matrix Factorization for Vocabulary Acquisition from Continuous Speech}. Enlightened by the extensively studied techniques in ASR, we design computational models to discover and represent vocabularies from continuous speech with little prior knowledge of the language to ...

Sun, Meng — Katholieke Universiteit Leuven


A Robust Face Recognition Algorithm for Real-World Applications

Face recognition is one of the most challenging problems of computer vision and pattern recognition. The difficulty in face recognition arises mainly from facial appearance variations caused by factors, such as expression, illumination, partial face occlusion, and time gap between training and testing data capture. Moreover, the performance of face recognition algorithms heavily depends on prior facial feature localization step. That is, face images need to be aligned very well before they are fed into a face recognition algorithm, which requires precise facial feature localization. This thesis addresses on solving these two main problems -facial appearance variations due to changes in expression, illumination, occlusion, time gap, and imprecise face alignment due to mislocalized facial features- in order to accomplish its goal of building a generic face recognition algorithm that can function reliably under real-world conditions. The proposed face recognition algorithm ...

Ekenel, Hazim Kemal — University of Karlsruhe


Subspace-based exponential data fitting using linear and multilinear algebra

The exponentially damped sinusoidal (EDS) model arises in numerous signal processing applications. It is therefore of great interest to have methods able to estimate the parameters of such a model in the single-channel as well as in the multi-channel case. Because such a model naturally lends itself to subspace representation, powerful matrix approaches like HTLS in the single-channel case, HTLSstack in the multi-channel case and HTLSDstack in the decimative case have been developed to estimate the parameters of the underlying EDS model. They basically consist in stacking the signal in Hankel (single-channel) or block Hankel (multi- channel) data matrices. Then, the signal subspace is estimated by means of the singular value decomposition (SVD). The parameters of the model, namely the amplitudes, the phases, the damping factors, and the frequencies, are estimated from this subspace. Note that the sample covariance matrix ...

Papy, Jean-Michel — Katholieke Universiteit Leuven


Functional Neuroimaging Data Characterisation Via Tensor Representations

The growing interest in neuroimaging technologies generates a massive amount of biomedical data that exhibit high dimensionality. Tensor-based analysis of brain imaging data has by now been recognized as an effective approach exploiting its inherent multi-way nature. In particular, the advantages of tensorial over matrix-based methods have previously been demonstrated in the context of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) source localization; the identification of the regions of the brain which are activated at specific time instances. However, such methods can also become ineffective in realistic challenging scenarios, involving, e.g., strong noise and/or significant overlap among the activated regions. Moreover, they commonly rely on the assumption of an underlying multilinear model generating the data. In the first part of this thesis, we aimed at investigating the possible gains from exploiting the 3-dimensional nature of the brain images, through a higher-order tensorization ...

Christos Chatzichristos — National and Kapodistrian University of Athens


Linear Dynamical Systems with Sparsity Constraints: Theory and Algorithms

This thesis develops new mathematical theory and presents novel recovery algorithms for discrete linear dynamical systems (LDS) with sparsity constraints on either control inputs or initial state. The recovery problems in this framework manifest as the problem of reconstructing one or more sparse signals from a set of noisy underdetermined linear measurements. The goal of our work is to design algorithms for sparse signal recovery which can exploit the underlying structure in the measurement matrix and the unknown sparse vectors, and to analyze the impact of these structures on the efficacy of the recovery. We answer three fundamental and interconnected questions on sparse signal recovery problems that arise in the context of LDS. First, what are necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of a sparse solution? Second, given that a sparse solution exists, what are good low-complexity algorithms that ...

Joseph, Geethu — Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore

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